2017年10月20日 星期五

Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning died in Florence, Italy on this day in 1861 (aged 55).
"Grief"
I tell you, hopeless grief is passionless; 
That only men incredulous of despair,
Half-taught in anguish, through the midnight air
Beat upward to God’s throne in loud access
Of shrieking and reproach. Full desertness,
In souls as countries, lieth silent-bare
Under the blanching, vertical eye-glare
Of the absolute heavens. Deep-hearted man, express
Grief for thy dead in silence like to death—
Most like a monumental statue set
In everlasting watch and moveless woe
Till itself crumble to the dust beneath.
Touch it; the marble eyelids are not wet:
If it could weep, it could arise and go.
*
Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning are without parallel in the nineteenth century: celebrated poets, they became equally famous for their marriage. Still popular more than a century after their deaths, their poetry vividly reflects the unique nature of their relationship. This collection presents the Brownings’ work in the context of their lives: the early years and their initial friendship, their courtship and marriage, the fifteen happy years they spent living in Italy until Elizabeth’s death. Whether in short poems such as Elizabeth’s “Hector in the Garden” and Robert’s “Natural Magic,” or in extracts from longer works such as Aurora Leigh and Pauline, the great themes they shared are all represented: love, marriage, illicit passion, England and Italy, childhood, religion, poetry, and nature. Elizabeth’s famous Sonnets from the Portuguese, based on their love affair, is included in its entirety. The poems are augmented with a generous selection of the marvelous letters the Brownings wrote to each other. READ more here: http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/…/browning-poems-by-robe…/


"A Woman's Last Word" by Robert Browning
I.
Let's contend no more, Love,
Strive nor weep:
All be as before, Love,
---Only sleep!
II.
What so wild as words are?
I and thou
In debate, as birds are,
Hawk on bough!
III.
See the creature stalking
While we speak!
Hush and hide the talking,
Cheek on cheek!
IV.
What so false as truth is,
False to thee?
Where the serpent's tooth is
Shun the tree---
V.
Where the apple reddens
Never pry---
Lest we lose our Edens,
Eve and I.
VI.
Be a god and hold me
With a charm!
Be a man and fold me
With thine arm!
VII.
Teach me, only teach, Love
As I ought
I will speak thy speech, Love,
Think thy thought---
VIII.
Meet, if thou require it,
Both demands,
Laying flesh and spirit
In thy hands.
IX.
That shall be to-morrow
Not to-night:
I must bury sorrow
Out of sight:
X
---Must a little weep, Love,
(Foolish me!)
And so fall asleep, Love,
Loved by thee.
*
Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning are without parallel in the nineteenth century: celebrated poets, they became equally famous for their marriage. Still popular more than a century after their deaths, their poetry vividly reflects the unique nature of their relationship. This collection presents the Brownings’ work in the context of their lives: the early years and their initial friendship, their courtship and marriage, the fifteen happy years they spent living in Italy until Elizabeth’s death. Whether in short poems such as Elizabeth’s “Hector in the Garden” and Robert’s “Natural Magic,” or in extracts from longer works such as Aurora Leigh and Pauline, the great themes they shared are all represented: love, marriage, illicit passion, England and Italy, childhood, religion, poetry, and nature. Elizabeth’s famous Sonnets from the Portuguese, based on their love affair, is included in its entirety. The poems are augmented with a generous selection of the marvelous letters the Brownings wrote to each other. READ more here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/…/browning-poems-by-rob…/

2017年10月19日 星期四

"Two Sonnets In Memory", "Recuerdo" ; "What Lips My Lips Have Kissed, And Where, And Why" by Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism.Wikipedia
BornFebruary 22, 1892, Rockland, Maine, United States
SpouseEugen Jan Boissevain (m. 1923–1949)

My candle burns at both ends; it will not last the night; but ah, my foes, and oh, my friends -- it gives a lovely light!
Childhood is the kingdom where nobody dies. Nobody that matters, that is.
Where you used to be, there is a hole in the world, which I find myself constantly walking around in the daytime, and falling in at night. I miss you like hell.




"Recuerdo" by Edna St. Vincent Millay
We were very tired, we were very merry—
We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry.
It was bare and bright, and smelled like a stable— 
But we looked into a fire, we leaned across a table,
We lay on a hill-top underneath the moon;
And the whistles kept blowing, and the dawn came soon.
We were very tired, we were very merry—
We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry;
And you ate an apple, and I ate a pear,
From a dozen of each we had bought somewhere;
And the sky went wan, and the wind came cold,
And the sun rose dripping, a bucketful of gold.
We were very tired, we were very merry,
We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry.
We hailed, “Good morrow, mother!” to a shawl-covered head,
And bought a morning paper, which neither of us read;
And she wept, “God bless you!” for the apples and pears,
And we gave her all our money but our subway fares.
*
This comprehensive and joyous celebration of metered verse brings together some of the best rhythmic lines in literature. After a century dominated by free verse, there is a new excitement about rediscovering poetry’s ancient musical and performative roots. Iambic pentameter is the most familiar meter for most readers, but it only scratches the surface of the extraordinary diversity of rhythmic patterns that poets have employed over the ages. That astonishing variety is fully explored in this one-of-a-kind anthology, packed with great poems that beg to be read aloud. MEASURE FOR MEASURE: AN ANTHOLOGY OF POETIC METERS is organized by meter, with brief explanatory headnotes covering accentual meter, trochees, anapests, dactyls, iambs, ballad meter, and more exotic species like amphibrachs, dipodics, hendecasyllabics, sapphics, and more. The entrancing examples of each meter are drawn from a wide range of poetic traditions, from Ovid and Sappho to Shakespeare and Milton, encompassing the Romantics, the Victorians, ballads, folk songs, poets of the Harlem Renaissance, and modern-day poets. Whether performed aloud or enjoyed in silence, Measure for Measure is a treat for the ear, the heart, and the mind. READ more here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/…/measure-for-measure-b…/





Everyman's Library

"What Lips My Lips Have Kissed, And Where, And Why" by Edna St. Vincent Millay

What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why,
I have forgotten, and what arms have lain
Under my head till morning; but the rain
Is full of ghosts tonight, that tap and sigh
Upon the glass and listen for reply,
And in my heart there stirs a quiet pain
For unremembered lads that not again
Will turn to me at midnight with a cry.
Thus in winter stands the lonely tree,
Nor knows what birds have vanished one by one,
Yet knows its boughs more silent than before:
I cannot say what loves have come and gone,
I only know that summer sang in me
A little while, that in me sings no more.
*
"Two Sonnets In Memory" by Edna St. Vincent Millay
(Nicola Sacco -- Bartolomeo Vanzetti)
Executed August 23, 1927
I
As men have loved their lovers in times past
And sung their wit, their virtue and their grace,
So have we loved sweet Justice to the last,
That now lies here in an unseemly place.
The child will quit the cradle and grow wise
And stare on beauty till his senses drown;
Yet shall be seen no more by mortal eyes
Such beauty as here walked and here went down.
Like birds that hear the winter crying plain
Her courtiers leave to seek the clement south;
Many have praised her, we alone remain
To break a fist against the lying mouth
Of any man who says this was not so:
Though she be dead now, as indeed we know.
II
Where can the heart be hidden in the ground
And be at peace, and be at peace forever,
Under the world, untroubled by the sound
Of mortal tears, that cease from pouring never?
Well for the heart, by stern compassion harried,
If death be deeper than the churchmen say, --
Gone from this world indeed what's graveward carried,
And laid to rest indeed what's laid away.
Anguish enough while yet the indignant breather
Have blood to spurt upon the oppressor's hand;
Who would eternal be, and hang in ether
A stuffless ghost above his struggling land,
Retching in vain to render up the groan
That is not there, being aching dust's alone?
*




One of America’s most beloved poets, Edna St. Vincent Millay burst onto the literary scene at a very young age and won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923. Her passionate lyrics and superbly crafted sonnets have thrilled generations of readers long after the notoriously bohemian lifestyle she led in Greenwich Village in the 1920s ceased to shock them. Millay’s refreshing frankness and cynicism and her ardent appetite for life still burn brightly on the page more than half a century after her death. This volume includes the early poems that many consider her best— “Renascence” and “The Ballad of the Harp Weaver” among them—as well as such often-memorized favorites as “What lips my lips have kissed” and “First Fig” (“My candle burns at both ends . . .”). The poet’s most famous verse drama, the one-act antiwar fable Aria da Capo, is included here as well.




2017年10月15日 星期日

JANE EYRE and VILLETTE (1853) By Charlotte Brontë


The London Library

Happy birthday #JaneEyre! #CharlotteBronte's masterpiece was first published #onthisday 1847 (under the pseudonym Currer Bell). She dedicated the book to her hero, great author (and member and auditor of The London Library !) #WilliamThackeray. They eventually met in 1850, at a famously stilted dinner, shortly after Bronte had been revealed as Jane Eyre's author.



Everyman's Library
Today is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charlotte Brontë. Brontë was born in Thornton, West Riding of Yorkshire, England on this day in 1816.
"If there are words and wrongs like knives, whose deep inflicted lacerations never heal - cutting injuries and insults of serrated and poison-dripping edge - so, too, there are consolations of tone too fine for the ear not fondly and for ever to retain their echo: caressing kindnesses - loved, lingered over through a whole life, recalled with unfaded tenderness, and answering the call with undimmed shine, out of that raven cloud foreshadowing Death himself."
--from VILLETTE (1853)
Left by harrowing circumstances to fend for herself in the great capital of a foreign country, Lucy Snowe, the narrator and heroine of Villette, achieves by degrees an authentic independence from both outer necessity and inward grief. Charlotte Brontë's last novel, published in 1853, has a dramatic force comparable to that of her other masterpiece, Jane Eyre, as well as strikingly modern psychological insight and a revolutionary understanding of human loneliness. With an introduction by Lucy Hughes-Hallet. READ an excerpt here:http://knopfdoubleday.com/book/18832/villette/





BBC Culture
Charlotte Brontë was born 200 years ago today.

It is 200 years since the birth of Charlotte Brontë, who in Jane Eyre created one of fiction’s most memorable heroines. Samantha Ellis explains why some characters endure.
BBC.COM|由 SAMANTHA ELLIS 上傳



Charlotte Brontë—and her heroine Jane Eyre—represented a new kind of woman, one for whom utterance was a necessity. "Something spoke out of me", says Jane, "over which I had no control". The beloved novelist was born on April 21st 1816


Charlotte Brontë was born on this day in 1816
ECON.ST


Today is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charlotte Brontë. Brontë was born in Thornton, West Riding of Yorkshire, England on this day in 1816.
"Gentle reader, may you never feel what I then felt? May your eyes never shed such stormy, scalding, heart-wrung tears as poured from mine. May you never appeal to Heaven in prayers so hopeless and so agonized as in that hour left my lips; for never may you, like me, dread to be the instrument of evil to what you wholly love."
--from JANE EYRE
Charlotte Brontë's most beloved novel describes the passionate love between the courageous orphan Jane Eyre and the brilliant, brooding, and domineering Rochester. The loneliness and cruelty of Jane's childhood strengthens her natural independence and spirit, which prove invaluable when she takes a position as a governess at Thornfield Hall. But after she falls in love with her sardonic employer, her discovery of his terrible secret forces her to make a heart-wrenching choice. Ever since its publication in 1847, Jane Eyre has enthralled every kind of reader, from the most critical and cultivated to the youngest and most unabashedly romantic. It lives as one of the great triumphs of storytelling and as a moving and unforgettable portrayal of a woman's quest for self-respect. READ an excerpt here:http://knopfdoubleday.com/book/18823/jane-eyre/

2017年10月14日 星期六

e e cummings的"God Pity Me Whom(God Distinctly Has)"; anyone lived in a pretty how town


Poet Edward Estlin Cummings was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts on this day in 1894.
"God Pity Me Whom(God Distinctly Has)" by E. E. Cummings
god pity me whom(god distinctly has)
the weightless svelte drifting sexual feather
of your shall i say body?follows
truly through a dribbling moan of jazz
whose arched occasional stepped youth swallows
curvingly the keeness of my hips;
or,your first twitch of crisp boy flesh dips
my height in a firm fragile stinging weather,
(breathless with sharp necessary lips)kid
female cracksman of the nifty,ruffian-rogue,
laughing body with wise breasts half-grown,
lisping flesh quick to thread the fattish drone
of I Want a Doll,
wispish-agile feet with slid
steps parting the tousle of saxophonic brogue.



想到e e cummings的anyone lived in a pretty how town,第二句(with up so floating many bells down) 便很費解

hc:(生活如)諸鐘上下浮擺(響應)

Howard Chang 有人這樣翻:
任何人性在一座美麗的奈何城
(隨著多少鐘聲飄上又飄下)
春天夏天秋天冬天
他歌頌他沒有做的,舞蹈著他做了的。


https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/detail/22653
[anyone lived in a pretty how town]

Related Poem Content Details


anyone lived in a pretty how town 
(with up so floating many bells down) 
spring summer autumn winter 
he sang his didn’t he danced his did. 

Women and men(both little and small) 
cared for anyone not at all 
they sowed their isn’t they reaped their same 
sun moon stars rain 

children guessed(but only a few 
and down they forgot as up they grew 
autumn winter spring summer) 
that noone loved him more by more 

when by now and tree by leaf 
she laughed his joy she cried his grief 
bird by snow and stir by still 
anyone’s any was all to her 

someones married their everyones 
laughed their cryings and did their dance 
(sleep wake hope and then)they 
said their nevers they slept their dream 

stars rain sun moon 
(and only the snow can begin to explain 
how children are apt to forget to remember 
with up so floating many bells down) 

one day anyone died i guess 
(and noone stooped to kiss his face) 
busy folk buried them side by side 
little by little and was by was 

all by all and deep by deep 
and more by more they dream their sleep 
noone and anyone earth by april 
wish by spirit and if by yes. 

Women and men(both dong and ding) 
summer autumn winter spring 
reaped their sowing and went their came 
sun moon stars rain

2017年10月12日 星期四

"The Shepherd" (1789) by William Blake

"The Shepherd" (1789) by William Blake
How sweet is the Shepherd's sweet lot
From the morn to the evening he strays;
He shall follow his sheep all the day,
And his tongue shall be filled with praise.
For he hears the lamb's innocent call,
And he hears the ewe's tender reply;
He is watchful while they are in peace,
For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.
*
William Blake is one of England’s most fascinating writers; he was not only a groundbreaking poet, but also a painter, engraver, radical, and mystic. Although Blake was dismissed as an eccentric by his contemporaries, his powerful and richly symbolic poetry has been a fertile source of inspiration to the many writers and artists who have followed in his footsteps. In this collection Patti Smith brings together her personal favorites of Blake’s poems, including the complete Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience, to give a singular picture of this unique genius, whom she calls in her moving introduction “the spiritual ancestor” of generations of poets.